Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:00 pm

I am listed as VU. We were hunted to near extinction with less than 100 individuals by the 1930s. In 1998 it was estimated that approximately 1,200 of us survived, of which around 542 occurred in national parks, 491 in provincial nature reserves, and 165 in other reserves. However the population has increased to about over 2,700 in the wild due to conservation efforts. We are currently protected in national parks but are still threatened.

The main threats to our species are from loss of habitat to agriculture, competition with domestic livestock, and hunting.

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Tue Feb 19, 2013 8:04 pm

Cape Mountain Zebra?

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:12 am

\O ^Q^ ^Q^

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Feb 20, 2013 10:16 am

O:V O:V O:V Well done, Flutty & Dewi!

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Feb 20, 2013 6:35 pm

Thanks Flutts, that was a bit of a wild guess from me as I remembered that the total population was down to 91 in the 1950's from an article that I'd read recently. Figured it had not changed much since the 30's as per your clue. Good to know that they are increasing slowly. \O

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Feb 20, 2013 7:35 pm

\O

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:46 pm

My species is considered VU and this is mainly because we don’t find enough large Leadwoods. 0' We need large trees with a diameter of 50 cm or so. Conservation must care for our trees as much as for ourselves! O-/ We have a very slow reproduction rate, we manage to raise about one young every nine years. :O^ Now some green people even try to hand rear the younger siblings of our kids. -O-

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Mar 13, 2013 1:14 pm

Ground hornbill

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Mar 13, 2013 4:00 pm

Spot on, pooky \O \O \O (and well done, Dewi - via PM, too \O )


At present, Southern Ground-Hornbills are considered internationally as ‘Vulnerable’ throughout their range in Africa by the IUCN, but within South Africa they have been classified as ‘Endangered', with their numbers outside of formally protected areas are still declining. It is even likely that the birds will soon meet the IUCN Red Data List Criteria as being ‘Critically Endangered’ in South Africa.
It is estimated that there are only about 1500 Ground-Hornbills left in South Africa, of which half are safe within the protected areas of the greater Kruger National Park The birds live in social, cooperatively breeding groups that consist of between two to nine birds (mean group size 3.6), but with only one alpha male and one breeding female per group and the rest of the group as helpers. This means there are only an estimated 417breeding groups in the whole of South Africa, while data from the Kruger National Park shows that, on average, only one chick is raised to adulthood every nine years.
The reasons for their decline are predominantly:
Loss of habitat: This affects both quality of foraging habitats and loss of suitable breeding sites through human exploitation of trees, thus reducing the number of available nest sites. Over-utilization of savannas, leading to loss of ground cover and/or encroachment of woody bushes, and afforestation of grasslands, both lead to reduction in the quality and area of foraging habitat available to the hornbills. This is coupled with expanding human settlements and plantations that further seriously reduce the amount of useful habitat.
Loss of nesting trees: The hornbills need a tree with a cavity with an internal diameter of at least 40cm. The aptly named Leadwood is the most frequently used and long-lasting tree nest site in South Africa, but the softer-wooded fig, ebony and marula are also used and, where it occurs, the mighty baobab. Conservation of these key tree species is as important as caring for the hornbills themselves. Where hornbills nest in cavities on cliffs there less chance of their site being damaged or lost.
Secondary poisoning: Whole groups have been eliminated by indirect poisoning during campaigns against livestock-predators and rabies-carriers, to which their systematic terrestrial foraging makes them especially prone. Poison is also used directly against problem birds, or eaten indirectly when bait for other birds such as vultures is poisoned.

Re: CRENVUNT - Why am I threatened?

Wed Mar 13, 2013 5:08 pm

Well done pooky. ^Q^