AW Insect Book: Mantids (Mantodea) Pics & Descriptions

Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:14 pm

Stick Mantid Hoplocoryphella grandis
Family: Thespidae; Subfamily: Hoplocoryphinae

Thespidae are a small family of lightly built mantids with elongate slender prothorax. The tibia or "finger" of fore limbs is less than half the length of the femur on which it closes.

Hoplocoryphella grandis

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KTP

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Identification
Large (body length 60mm), very slender and delicate, pale brown with elongate spindly limbs and remarkably widened "hammer-shaped" head. Beautiful translucent, bubble-like egg case with sculptured ridge down one side. Females with shortened wings that do not reach the end of the abdomen.

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Head Shape:

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# 48 shows the small protrusions on the posterior (rear) portion of the head of H. grandis

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Biology
Primarily an arid region species.

Habitat
Dry grasses and other vegetation.

http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/man ... /index.htm

Re: AW Insect Book: Mantids (Mantodea) Pics & Descriptions

Mon Feb 02, 2015 6:27 pm

Oxypiloidea subcornuta*
Family: Hymenopodidae; Subfamily: Acromantinae

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KTP

Identification
Oxypiloidea is identifiable by upright teeth on prothorax, a small pair close together in front and a larger pair separated behind. The pronotum has a markedly toothed edge and the 3rd discoidal spine of anterior femur is markedly lengthened. Mottled and extremely cryptic, with the end of hind wings square, and possessing powerful grasping limbs.

Distribution
KwaZulu-Natal, Gauteng and Northern Province, to Zimbabwe and Botswana


*PGW Field Guide identification is O.tridens (??)
(http://www.biodiversityexplorer.org/man ... nopodidae/)

AW Insect Book: Mantids (Mantodea) Pics & Descriptions

Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:33 pm

Zebra Mantid Omomantis zebrata
Family: Mantidae. Subfamily: Mantinae

Image © Michele Nel
Kruger National Park, Tamboti

Image © BluTuna
Kruger National Park, Crocodile Bridge

Description
A medium sized, slender, green mantid. Both sexes reach up to 6 cm in bodysize, where males stay a little more slender. The species belongs to the "normal type" and shows no morphological peculiarities such as a vertex elongation or lobes. The base color can reach from a light to a deep and shiny green to a turquoise-green. The upper side of the femura and the dorsal side of the pronotum are colored in a reddish brown. Characterized by coloration of fore wings, each decorated with diagonal dark brown stripes and a yellow spot surrounded by black. The habitus of Omomantis zebrata is rather gracile, rather strinking are the long and thin walking legs.
The sexes of juveniles can easily be distinguished by counting abdominal segments, the females have 6 of them, the males 8.

Distribution
Found in Eastern Cape and Gauteng, to Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Angola, Malawi and East Africa.

Re: AW Insect Book: Mantids (Mantodea) Pics & Descriptions

Sat Mar 05, 2016 4:19 pm

Ghost Mantid, Leaf Mantid Phyllocrania paradoxa
Family: Mantidae. Subfamily: Hymenopodidae

Image © steamtrainfan

Image © steamtrainfan
Garden in Pretoria

Description
Phyllocrania paradoxa is a mid-sized species reaching up to 5 cm in bodylength in both sexes (without wings). The variability of color is characteristic for this species, reaching from almost black to sandy yellow and green. Nontheless the animals are not plain-colored, but show a faint pattern of stipes and dots, which is only visible to the closer look. The habitus with its long, jagged vertex elongation and lobe-like appendages on the abdomen and the walking legs is based on a leaf. The veins of the wings, which are mostly transparent, help with this imitation.
Phyllocrania paradoxa is easily sexed. First the males have 8 abdominal sements, the females have only 6. A further distinguishing mark is the "crown" (vertex elongation). In females, it is rather wide, not jagged and shows a slight median bend to the left. The male's crown is longer, more slender and jagged. In addition, the male's wings reach over the abdomen, which is not the case in females. The antannea of the male are longer then the female's, too. The sexual dimorphism of the crown can be already used in larvae.
Ghost mantids, like many other insects that rely on leaf-like camouflage, display an ungodly degree of polymorphism, and no two specimens are alike.

Distribution
KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng, to Namibia, Zimbabwe, Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi and East Africa, throughout sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar .

Links: Checklist: The Praying Mantises (Mantodea: Mantidae) of South Africa