AW Insect Book: Sawflies Wasps Bees Ants Pics & Descript

Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:26 pm

Cuckoo Bee Coelioxys sp., possibly Coelioxys circumscriptus
Superfamily Apoidea. Family Megachilidae. Subfamily Megachilinae. Tribe Megachilini

Image
Garden in Johannesburg

Image
Garden in Johannesburg

Description
Metasoma pointed distally, bifurcate in males, not curled under. A darkly coloured bee with sharply defined hair bands on the abdomen. The hairless eyes are strikingly different from those of most subgenera.
Females have a 6 segment, elongated abdomen and the males a 7 segment spiny one.

Distribution
South Africa.

Re: AW Insect Book: Sawflies Wasps Bees Ants Pics & Descript

Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:36 pm

Leaf Cutter Bee Megachile sp.
Superfamily Apoidea. Family Megachilidae. Subfamily Megachilinae. Tribe Megachilini

Image © BluTuna
Male. Garden in Johannesburg

Megachile are the only pollen collecting bees in the Megachilini.
There are 15 sub-Saharan subgenera: Amegachile, Chalicodoma, Callomegachile, Creightonella, Cuspidella, Eutricharaea, Gronoceras, Heriadopsis, Largella, Maximegachile, Megella, Paracella, Platysta, Pseudomegachile and Stenomegachile.

Megachile bees have the Metasoma rounded distally, often toothed in males but always curled under.

AW Insect Book: Sawflies Wasps Bees Ants Pics & Descript

Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:45 pm

Leaf Cutter Bee Megachile sp.
Superfamily Apoidea. Family Megachilidae. Subfamily Megachilinae. Tribe Megachilini

Image © BluTuna
This Mechilid has taken over an abandoned Eumeninae wasp nest; the characteristic downcurved mud turrets would suggest the nest was made by Tricarinodynerus guerinii.

Image © BluTuna
A leaf cutter bee taking a slice of leaf into the nest.
Kruger National Park, Timbavati Picnic Spot

AW Insect Book: Sawflies Wasps Bees Ants Pics & Descript

Wed Apr 15, 2015 7:58 pm

Leaf Cutter Bee Megachile Subgenus Eutricharea
Superfamily Apoidea. Family Megachilidae. Subfamily Megachilinae. Tribe Megachilini

Image © BluTuna
Garden in Johannesburg

Re: AW Insect Book: Sawflies Wasps Bees Ants Pics & Descript

Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:02 pm

Megachilid Bee
Family: Megachilidae

Image
Imfolozi

The Megachilidae are a cosmopolitan family of (mostly) solitary bees distinguishable by the brush of pollen-carrying hairs (called a scopa) being restricted to the underside surface of the abdomen (rather than mostly or exclusively on the hind legs as in other bee families).

Megachilid genera are most commonly known as mason bees and leafcutter bees, reflecting the materials from which they build their nest cells (soil or leaves, respectively); a few collect plant or animal hairs and fibers, and are called carder bees. All species feed on nectar and pollen, but a few are cleptoparasites (informally called "cuckoo bees"), feeding on pollen collected by other megachilid bees. Parasitic species do not possess scopae. Megachilid bees are among the world's most efficient pollinators because of their energetic swimming-like motion in the reproductive structures of flowers, which moves pollen, as needed for pollination. One of the reasons they are efficient pollinators is their frequency of visits to plants, but this is because they are extremely inefficient at gathering pollen. Compared to all other bee families, megachilids require on average nearly 10 times as many trips to flowers to gather sufficient resources to provision a single brood cell.

Re: AW Insect Book: Sawflies, Wasps, Bees & Ants (Hymenopter

Thu May 28, 2015 9:05 pm

I was idly sitting watching TV when a movement out the corner of my eye made me look down near where our sliding door closes against the door frame.

It was a wasp buzzing around its nest which was built neatly in the groove between two layers of bricks and it was carrying a worm which it proceeded to push into the hole in its nest. I was so engrossed watching this that I forgot to get the camera. Next minute it was gone.

I duly waited for the next few hours to see if it would come back but no luck.

A few days later I saw it again near the nest but this time it was carrying some mud and then proceeded to block up the entrance to the nest.

This time I shot off, fetched the camera and managed to take the following photos.

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Can anyone give us some info on what wasp this is, why is it doing what it is and any other interesting info.

I am now waiting to see if and when the youngsters break out and hopefully I will have my camera with me.

Re: AW Insect Book: Sawflies, Wasps, Bees & Ants (Hymenopter

Thu May 28, 2015 9:11 pm

Might be this one?

Subject: AW Insect Book: Sawflies, Wasps, Bees & Ants (Hymenoptera)


O:V O:V O:V

Re: AW Insect Book: Sawflies, Wasps, Bees & Ants (Hymenopter

Fri May 29, 2015 8:02 am

Sure looks like it.

Thanks Toko.