Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Mon Aug 04, 2014 1:38 pm

Monkey Grasshopper possibly Lophothericles sp.
Family: Thericleidae

Image © Lisbeth
Kruger National Park

Thericleidae are small stocky grasshoppers with very short antennae and powerful hind legs. They have 2 well-developed spurs at inner ends of hind tibiae.
They occur on shrubs and small trees rather than grasses.

Common genera in Southern Africa:
Megalithericles, Thericlesiella, Barythericles, Lophothericles, Whitea, Xenothericles, Dysidiothericles, Microthericles, Icmalides, Mistothericles,, Nepiothericles,Pseudothericles, Stenothericles, Raphithericles, Schulthessiella, Thericles, Athlithericles, Bufothericles

This species is recorded as Brachytypus rotundifrons in Picker, M., Griffiths & Weaving. 2005. Field Guide to Insects of Southern Africa, but that might be wrong 0:

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Aug 08, 2014 8:30 pm

Long-legged Armoured Katydid Acanthoplus longipes
Family: Bradyporidae. Subfamily Heterodinae

Image © Super Mongoose

Image © Super Mongoose
Augrabies Falls National Park

The Hetrodinae are distributed all over Africa and neighbouring areas and are called armoured ground crickets because of spikes on their pronotum and legs. These crickets are flightless with rudimentary wings that are covered under the pronotum. Acanthoplus longipes (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Hetrodinae) is

Description
A dark grey-brown and ventrally yellow-green cricket with spines only on the pronotum.

Distribution
Acanthoplus longipes is widespread in Namibia but is also present in the northernmost regions of Northern Cape Province, South Africa, southern Angola, and may possibly occur in Botswana.

Habitat
Semi-arid and arid habitats and grassland including the Kalahari and Namib Deserts.

Links: Checklist: The Armoured Crickets (Orthoptera: Bradyporidae) of South Africa

Image © Super Mongoose

Image © Super Mongoose
Augrabies Falls National Park

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:27 am

Family Thericleidae
Thericleidae is a family of Orthoptera grasshoppers (Infraorder: Acrididea, Superfamily: Eumastacoidea), found in Africa.
Small hoppers, very similar to Euschmidtiids, but distinguished by 2 well developed spurs at inner ends of hind tibiae.
They occur on shrubs and small trees rather than grasses.
78 species reported from the region.

Links: Orthoptera Species File

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Wed Jan 07, 2015 9:46 am

Bush Hopper Thericles sp.
Infraorder Acrididea. Superfamily Eumastacoidea. Superfamily Family Thericleidae. Subfamily Thericleinae. Tribe Thericleini

Image © Richprins
Kruger National Park, Biyamiti Loop

Description
Hoppers in the genus Thericles are small (body length of males 10 mm) and stocky, with short rod-like antennae and very large eyes. Abdomen upturned. White markings on brown body. Green legs. Wingless.

Distribution
North eastern parts of South Africa.

Habitat
On shrubs in grassland and bushveld.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Wed Mar 25, 2015 9:16 pm

African or Mediterranean Field Cricket, Common Garden Cricket Gryllus bimaculatus
Suborder: Ensifera. Family: Gryllidae.

Image © BluTuna
Kruger National Park, Crocodile Bridge

Description
Large (body length 25 mm), males shiny black, females dark brown, both with 2 yellow shoulder patches.

Distribution
Very widespread, occurring all over Africa and into Europe and Asia.

Habitat
Gardens, grassland, typically in association with human habitation and cities.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:26 am

Common Milkweed Locust Phymateus morbillosus
Suborder: Caelifera. Infraorder: Acrididea. Superfamily: Pyrgomorphoidea. Family: Pyrgomorphidae. Tribe: Phymateini

Image © arks
Darling Hills Road, Western Cape

Description
Large (body length 60-72 mm), bulky, with red thorax or red knobs on green prothorax. Fore wings dark bluish green with yellowish veins, hind wings mostly red.

AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts

Wed Apr 29, 2015 1:54 pm

Rain Locust Lamarckiana sp.
Suborder Caelifera. Superfamily Acridoidea. Family Pamphagidae. Subfamily Porthetinae

Image © BluTuna
Male. Kruger National Park, Crocodile Bridge Camp

AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Feb 12, 2016 11:58 am

True Leaf Katydid Zabalius sp.
Family: Tettigoniidae. Subfamily: Pseudophyllinae

Image © Hawkeyes
Kruger National Park, Lower Sabie

Zabalius is a genus of true katydids. Its distribution is essentially Afrotropical. They are generally heavily built and large (body length 60 mm), tree-dwelling herbivorous katydids, capable of flight and bright green. They mimic the colouration and markings of the leaves to a remarkable degree. Their thin antennae exceed body length, they have 4-segmented tarsi and ears are located on the front tibiae.

Links:
Orthoptera Species Files

AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts

Tue May 24, 2016 6:30 pm

Armoured Katydid Acanthoplus discoidalis
Family: Bradyporidae. Subfamily Heterodinae

Image © Mel
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Description
A wide-bodied, flightless species that typically grows to a body length of about 5 cm. The pronotum bears several sharp, conical spines. The mandibles, or main biting jaws, are powerful; they can inflict a painful nip and they permit the insect to feed on material such as tough herbage or carrion.
This species is omnivorous and feeds opportunistically on many different foods. Especially when their diet is deficient in protein and salt, members of the species commonly become cannibalistic :shock:
These Katydids have an arsenal of defence mechanisms in response to attack. Males but not females can stridulate when attacked, while both sexes will bite and regurgitate or squirt toxic blood which in insects is called haemolymph, from gaps in their exoskeleton on their backs and under their legs upon provocation. O-/

Distribution
Acanthoplus discoidalis is fairly widespread throughout Botswana, Namibia, and Northern Cape Province, South Africa. Small populations are also found in the Western and Eastern Cape Provinces of South Africa.

Habitat
The species is generally associated with very dry, sparsely vegetated habitats, including the Kalahari and Namib Deserts, Succulent and Nama Karoo and Fynbos biomes.

Links: Checklist: The Armoured Crickets (Orthoptera: Bradyporidae) of South Africa; Walker, Matt (28 July 2009). "Insect defence all blood and guts". BBC Earth News.