Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Apr 11, 2014 7:18 pm

Blue-wing Sphingonotus scabriculus
Family: Acrididae Subfamily: Acridinae. Tribe: Sphingonotini

Image
KTP

Description
Medium-sized (body length 24-32 mm), whose color varies according to the predominant color of the stones and soil where it is found. Lighter-colored specimens occur on limestone. Head, thorax and first third of wings dark brown, with 4 brown bands over remainder of tegmina. The hind-wings are pale blue at the base and bear a broad black band occupying about half the surface of each wing.

Distribution
Southern Africa, Namibia

Habitat
Bare stony ground with sparse low vegetation. Widespread.

Biology
Makes a characteristic click or snap of the wings during short, buoyant flights, and settles briefly after displaying the colorful hindwings. Never occurs in large numbers.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Apr 11, 2014 8:12 pm

Shorthorned Grasshopper Rhodesiana cuneicerca
Family: Acrididae. Subfamily Euryphyminae

Image
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Distribution
Endemic to Kalahari - Southern Africa, Botswana

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sun Apr 13, 2014 12:10 am

Burrowing Grasshopper, Band-wing Grasshopper Acrotylus diana
Family Acrididae. Subfamily: Oedipodinae. Tribe: Acrotylini

Image
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Description
Most species of the subfamily Oedipodinae, as implied by the common name, have a dark band crossing the hind wing somewhere between the middle and outer margin, most have the basal part (or "disc") of the wing colored. A few species have entirely dark or clear hind wings. The relative placement and shape of the dark band, as well as the color of the base is often of great help in identifying the species.

Members of the genus Acrotylus are burrowing grasshoppers, whose middle legs are elongated for digging. They are also medium-sized ( 20 - 30 mm) with large, bulging eyes, and hind legs banded with black.

Distribution
Southern Africa, Namibia

Habitat
Open habitat in savanna in loose shifting sand or hard gravelly soil, such as disturbed areas, e.g. road verges.

Biology
Members of Acrotylus are poor fliers, displaying banded hind wings in flight. They bury themselves when disturbed or in windy conditions, using the middle legs. Stridulate loudly. Egg pod with hard wall, lacking a cap. Rising spring temperatures break the resting period (diapause) of the eggs. There are 2 generations per year.

Environmental Impact
The grasshoppers of the tribe Acrotylini are entirely vegetarian and voracious feeders. They cause severe damage to various valued crops.



http://orthoptera.speciesfile.org/Commo ... ID=1104056

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:26 am

Bark Katydid Cymatomera denticollis
Family: Tettigoniidae. Subfamily: Pseudophyllinae. Tribe: Cymatomerini

Image
Kruger National Park

Description
Large (body length 55 mm), with 3 ridges along light grey prothorax. Abdomen barred in red, orange, yellowand black. Fore wings marked in grey brown and orange. Broad grey hind wings banded in light brown.

Habitat
This species is associated with open habitats, mostly miombo or mopane woodland.

Biology
Active at night. It spends the day resting on trunks of small-leaved trees.
Cymatomera denticollis is unusual among katydids in its ability to produce chemical defenses. When threatened, bark katydids fan their wings and reveal a brightly colored, red, orange, and black abdomen. At the same time a gland on their abdomen sprays a strongly smelling liquid.

source :
http://www.ispot.org.za/node/245346
and
http://www.ispot.org.za/node/229062%20this%20is%20the%20only%20one%20in%20its%20genus%20in%20S.%20Africa.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:49 pm

Bush Hopper possibly Amatonga or Pseudamatonga sp
Family Euschmidtiidae. Subfamily Pseudoschmidtiinae. Tribe Penichrotini

Image

Image
Kruger National Park

Description
Bush hoppers of the family Euschmidtiidae are small (body length 20 mm), body flattened from side to side, antennae short. Many species short-winged or wingless. When magnified, inner end of hind tibiae shows a single spine.

Amatonga contains 2 species (A. inhacae and A. spicata), both medium-sized (body length 24 mm), green or brown, with characteristic cylindrical body tapering at both ends, very short antennae, and white cheek stripe. Sit with hind legs positioned at 90° to the body and flat on substrate.

The genus Pseudamatonga contains 3 species: A. carinicrus, A. elongata, A. strigilifer

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Thu Apr 24, 2014 11:06 pm

Banded Cricket, Decorated Cricket, Tropical House Cricket Gryllodes sigillatus
Family: Gryllidae Subfamily: Gryllinae

Image

Image
Female, Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park


Identification
They are 13 to 18 mm long, light yellowish-brown, somewhat flattened cricket. Males have wings that only half cover the abdomen and females are practically wingless. The space between the antennae is narrow (about the width of the basal segment of either antenna), and there is a single dark transverse band between the eyes.

Distribution
It is probably native to southwestern Asia but has been spread by commerce globally throughout the world.

Habitat
Common in urban areas and are most frequently found outdoors in or near paved areas. At night they issue from hiding places, such as crevices between pavement blocks, to forage (like roaches) and sing (like crickets). When they move into buildings, as they occasionally do, their songs reveal their presence.

Song
The calling song (690 Kb wav file) consists of a sequence of brief chirps, each with three principal pulses. Within a chirp, each pulse represents a closure of the wings while a scraper on one wing engages a toothed file on the other. The pulses of a chirp grow successively longer as 1/2, 3/4 and the entire file is used. Only males call.
Listen to their song

Mating
When a female is attracted to the song, courtship ensues. In the cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, males transfer to females a two-part spermatophore containing a sperm-filled ampulla and a gelatinous, nutrient-rich spermatophylax (nuptial gift) on which the female feeds while the sperm pass into her internal sperm receptacle. The bigger the mass, the longer the sperm may have to enter, because the female usually eats all or part of the covering prior to removing the spermatophore proper.

Life Cycle
There is no special overwintering stage and generations are continuous. Depending on the temperature, development from egg to adult takes two to three months.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Apr 25, 2014 3:06 pm

Stick Grasshopper Acrida sp.
Family: Acrididae. Subfamily: Acridinae

Image © BluTuna
Magaliesberg, Gauteng

In the region, there are 7 species in the genus Acrida.
They are large, green or straw-coloured, with strongly elongated, almost stick-like body. Antenna ensiform, as long as or slightly shorter than head and pronotum together. Head strongly elongated, acutely conical. Elytra and wings fully developed; elytra with dense reticulation.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sat Apr 26, 2014 9:28 pm

Leaf Katydid Nymph possibly Phaneroptera sp.
Family: Tettigoniidae. Subfamily: Phaneropterinae. Tribe Phaneropterini

Image © BluTuna

Image © BluTuna
Garden in Johannesburg

Mating Behavior, Oviposition and Life History in Katydids
Male singing begins the mating sequence in virtually all katydids. The wings are raised and a dorsal scraper on the right tegmen is rubbed across a file on the underside of the left tegmen.
During copulation males of most species transfer a spermatophylax as part of the spermatophore, a meal that the female eats after the pair separates.
The mated female oviposits into plant tissue or soil. The Phaneropterinae differ from locusts in their habits of oviposition. Their eggs are rarely deposited in the earth or twigs but are either glued fast in double rows to the outer surface of slender twigs or are inserted in the edges of leaves. The Phaneropterinae exhibit a striking diversity of oviposition sites, including crevices in bark, cementing eggs onto twigs like overlapping roof shingles injecting them into the pith of twigs or leaf tissue between the epidermal layers (e.g. Phaneroptera), and even plastering the eggs into a mud "nest" onto stones and twigs.
The egg as the overwintering stage and a single generation per year is the most common life-history in species experiencing distinct seasons. In warmer climes there can be two annual bouts of oviposition resulting in two overlapping generations or continuously overlapping generations where all stages of the life cycle are present year round. After hatching, larvae pass through four to nine instars, depending on the species, before adulthood.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sun May 18, 2014 2:53 pm

Porthetine Grasshopper
Family: Pamphagidae. Subfamily: Porthetinae

This one resembles species in the genus Pagopedilum or Cultrinatus :-?

Image © Hawkeyes
Jozini Dam, KwaZulu-Natal

Grasshoppers in the family Pamphagidae are large (body length up to 70 mm), primitive, heavily built, normally cryptically coloured in dull earthy shades or superb stone-mimics. When viewed from above, the snout region of the head has a short furrow running towards the eyes (the fastigial furrow). Very broad, sword-shaped, triangular antennae, not round in cross section. Very rough body surface, often bearing tubercles and spines. Pronotum has a raised keel-like crest, which may be punctured by a series of small holes. Most males are able to stridulate.

71 species are known from the region.

Many species of African pamphagids, especially those belonging to the subfamily Porthetinae, exhibit sexual dimorphism. In most species the males are fully winged and usually can fly quite well. Females of all Porthetinae are completely wingless and even larger than the males. Their body is also more heavily sclerotized and often covered with hard ridges and spines. Surprisingly, despite the lack of wings, females are also capable of producing sound by rubbing their legs against the rough surface of the abdomen. The sound, which is much softer than that of the male, is used to startle potential predators; in some species immature individuals are also capable of such defensive stridulation.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Thu Jun 19, 2014 10:18 am

Rain Locust Lamarckiana sp.
Family: Pamphagidae. Subfamily: Porthetinae

Image © BluTuna
Female

Image

Image © BluTuna
Kruger National Park, Mopani area

Description
Large (body length 60-100 mm), generally uniformly grey, with very flattened antennae, and cream cheek and prothoracic stripe. Thick hind legs, covered with sharp spines. There is a hearing organ on either side of the thorax. Porthetinae exhibit a remarkable sexual dimorphism.
Males are winged with smoky black hind wings, they can fly quite well.
Females are wingless and even larger than the males. Their body is also more heavily sclerotized and covered with hard ridges and spines.

Distribution
Southern Africa.

Biology
Lamarckiana are nocturnal. Males call from trees by night.
Females are also capable of producing sound by rubbing their legs against the rough surface of the abdomen. The sound is used to startle potential predators.

Links: Genus Lamarckiana