Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sat Dec 07, 2013 5:53 pm

Armoured Ground Cricket, Corn Cricket, Armored Ground Katydid Acanthoplus armativentris
Family: Bradyporidae. Subfamily Heterodinae

Image © mposthumus
Kruger National Park

Image © Heksie
Kruger National Park, H14

Description
A large bodied flightless cricket, about 50 mm, with small sharp spikes on the thorax and legs.

Distribution
Northern South Africa, to Botswana, Zimbabwe and Mozambique; most months.

Biology
Eggs are laid in the soil.
It can release a noxious yellow liguid from its thoracic glands.
They are herbivorous scavengers, often cannibalising other killed on roads.

Links: Checklist: The Armoured Crickets (Orthoptera: Bradyporidae) of South Africa

Image © Kesheshe
Kruger National Park

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Mon Dec 09, 2013 7:44 pm

Rain Locust Lamarckiana sp.
Family: Pamphagidae. Subfamily: Porthetinae

Image © mposthumus
Female

Image © mposthumus
Kruger National Park, Mopani

Description
Large (body length 60-100 mm), generally uniformly grey, with very flattened antennae, and cream cheek and prothoracic stripe. Thick hind legs, covered with sharp spines. There is a hearing organ on either side of the thorax. Porthetinae exhibit a remarkable sexual dimorphism.
Males are winged with smoky black hind wings, they can fly quite well.
Females are wingless and even larger than the males. Their body is also more heavily sclerotized and covered with hard ridges and spines.

Distribution
Southern Africa.

Biology
Lamarckiana are nocturnal. Males call from trees by night.
Females are also capable of producing sound by rubbing their legs against the rough surface of the abdomen. The sound is used to startle potential predators.

Links: Genus Lamarckiana

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sat Dec 14, 2013 12:36 pm

Shieldback Locust possibly Lobosceliana sp.
Family: Pamphagidae. Subfamily: Porthetinae

Image Female © mposthumus
Kruger National Park, S128 - between Tshokwane and Lower Sabie

Description
Stone Grasshopper of the genus Lobosceliana are large (body length 43-68 mm), brown, with tan pronotum edged with white stripe and with 2 brown wedge-shaped markings. Antennae broad and flattened. Males winged, with brown hind wings. Females wingless.

Distribution
Southern Africa.

Links: Genus Lobosceliana

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Thu Jan 09, 2014 9:12 am

King Cricket possibly Nasidius sp.
Family: Anostostomatidae

Image © mposthumus

Image © mposthumus
Kruger National Park, Pretoriuskop area

44 genera of African Anostostomatidae in 7 or 8 valid genera have been described. Roughly half of these are from South Africa. The members of this family used to be placed in either the families Stenopelmatidae, Henicidae or Mimnermidae. The most well-known species in South Africa is the 'Parktown prawn' Libanasidus vittatus which is commonly encountered in people's homes in Johannesburg. Members of the genus Henicus are almost entirely limited to the Western and Eastern Cape and recent investigations by Peter Johns have shown that there are many undescribed species and that the species of this genus tend to be highly endemic with relatively small distributions.
Possibly found in Kruger National Park are the genera Libanasa, Libanasidus, Nasidius and Onosandrus.
All species are nocturnal omnivores and most adult males have enlarged mandibles.
12 species of Nasidius have been described, but there at least another 23 undescribed species.

Links: Laurence H. Field: The Biology of Wetas, King Crickets and Their Allies; H Brettschneider: Systematics of southern African Anostostomatidae (PDF)

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Thu Jan 09, 2014 9:40 am

King Cricket sp
Family: Anostostomatidae

Another unidentified King Cricket species, about bout 8 cm long! :shock:

Image © Richprins
Nelspruit/Mbombela, Mpumalanga

-O- -O- -O-

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Wed Feb 12, 2014 6:11 pm

Leaf Katydid sp Eurycorypha sp
Family: Tettigoniidae. Subfamily: Phaneropterinae

Image © BluTuna

Image © BluTuna
Hartebeespoort Dam area, North West Province

Eurycorypha Leaf katydids are medium-sized (body length 22 mm), with oval and elongated eyes. Yellow stripe usually through eye. Open 'ears' on fore tibiae in males. Tegmina bend sharply, lending a hump-backed appearance.
The genus is indigenous to Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar. It is the most species-rich Phaneropterinae genus in Africa.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Fri Feb 21, 2014 6:14 pm

Elegant Grasshopper Zonocerus elegans
Family: Pyrgomorphidae

Image © serval
Kruger National Park

Foam grasshoppers are small to large grasshoppers distinguished by a combination of bright colours, conical head, fastigial furrow, and a pair of warty crescents on either side of the fastigial furrow. Many have warning coloration and can produce a foamy defensive secretion; a few can produce sound. Most feed on herbs or shrubs, but rarely on grasses. Mostly gregarious at all stages.

Description
Medium to large (body length 28-50 mm), head mainly black, antennae black with orange bands or rings. Tegmina large; plain green or greenish yellow at the base.

Distribution
Widely distributed in tropical Africa.

Habitat
Common on low shrubs in subtropical areas.

Biology
Pest of vegetables and fruit trees in the Northern Cape and Free State. In tropical areas, a pest of cotton, cocoa, coffee and many other crops.
It shows a preference for the milkweed (rarely grasses). It can emit a nauseating yellow fluid when disturbed. Eggs are laid communally in autumn and remain in the ground for 6 months, hatching in spring and reaching maturity in 75 days. One generation per year. Males produce sounds during aggressive interaction.

Links: Pests of Field Crops in Southern Africa

Image © Hawkeyes
Lake Eland Game Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal

Image

Image © Flutterby
Rietvlei Nature Reserve, Gauteng

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Sun Apr 06, 2014 8:03 pm

Rain Locust Lamarckiana sparrmani
Family: Pamphagidae. Subfamily: Porthetinae

Image Male
KTP

Description
Large (body length 60-100 mm), generally uniformly grey, with cream cheek and prothoracic stripe. Thick hind legs, covered with sharp spines. Antenna in basal part strongly widened and compresed, with two wide medial segments and five apical, forming flagellum. Head relatively small. Crest of pronotum very low. There is a hearing organ on either side of the thorax. Males are winged with smoky black hind wings. Elytron exceeds end of abdomen by about one and a half length of pronotum. When flushed, the males fly strongly for some distance.
Females are wingless and even larger than the males. Their body is also more heavily sclerotized and covered with hard ridges and spines.
Both sexes can produce sound, but via differing mechanisms.

Distribution
Southern Africa, Namibia.

Biology
Nocturnal, sluggish. Males call from trees. Females rest on the ground.

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:12 pm

Tree Locust Anacridium moestum
Suborder Caelifera. Infraorder Acrididea. Superfamily Acridoidea. Family Acrididae. Subfamily Cyrtacanthacridinae

Image © ExFmem
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Description
Very large (body length 50 - 90 mm) but slender, with mottled reddish brown or grey body, and grey, finely speckled tegmina. Hind wings pale blue with broad black band near the base. Hind tibia purple. Nymphs (hoppers) are yellowish green.

Distribution
All over South Africa, northwards up to Nigeria and Uganda.

Habitat
Always in trees or shrubs in veld with scattered acacias.

Biology
The Anacridium are outstanding for their dark dense swarms. This species, A. moestum, swarms on occasion.

Food Hosts/Environmental Impact
Preferred foodplants are Acacia, Zizyphus, Capparis aphelia, and gum trees. Can damage crops, specifically fruit trees in the Free State.

Image © Tina
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, Grootkolk

Re: AW Insect Book: Crickets, Grasshoppers & Locusts - Photo

Wed Apr 09, 2014 10:16 pm

Slender Red-winged Grasshopper Acrotylus patruelis
Family: Acrididae. Subfamily: Oedipodinae. Tribe: Acrotylini

Image
KTP

Description
Usually dusty brown in color, medium sized (body length 20 - 30 mm), with large bulging eyes. The middle legs are elongated for digging. Hind legs banded with black. Antennae filiform, longer than head and pronotum together; 24-26 segments, dark brownish with white spots at base. Forewings semitransparent with incomplete light band at base, apex transparent with brownish speckles, extending to the middle of hind tibia. Hind wings are red, hence its common name.

Distribution
Occurs in parts of Africa, Southern Europe (northwards occasionally to Ticino, Switzerland) and Western Asia.

Habitat
Sandy or stony places with scarce vegetation in open disturbed areas, especially in low altitudes.

Environmental Impact
The grasshoppers of the tribe Acrotylini are entirely vegetarian and voracious feeders. They cause severe damage to various valued crops.
Last edited by ExFmem on Sat Apr 12, 2014 11:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.