Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Wed Mar 25, 2015 9:47 pm

Dung Beetle Heliocopris sp.
Suborder: Polyphaga. Family: Scarabaeidae. Subfamily: Scarabaeinae. Tribe: Ateuchini

Image © BluTuna
Kruger National Park, Crocodile Bridge

The genus Heliocopris is represented by 46 large nocturnal species in Africa.
Heliocopris comprises strongly convex, large-bodied species. Elytra with two lateral carina. They have thick legs with backward projecting spines that allow them to get traction in the soil while the beetle tunnels by lowering the blade-like front of its head into the earth and making powerful upward thrusts.
Heliocopris species are typically elephant dung specialists and their distribution largely coincides with that of elephants and other pachyderms such as rhino.

Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:53 pm

Tar Darkling Beetle Somaticus aeneus
Family: Tenebrionidae. Subfamily: Pimeliinae. Tribe: Sepidiini

Image © nan
Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Re: Africa Wild Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Tue Mar 31, 2015 5:01 pm

Blister Beetle Hycleus lugens
Family: Meloidae. Subfamily: Meloinae. Tribe: Mylabrini

Image © BluTuna
Lower Sabie, Kruger National Park

Links: Meloidae.com

Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Sat Jul 25, 2015 10:10 am

Giant Flattened Dung Beetle Pachylomera femoralis
Suborder: Polyphaga. Family: Scarabaeidae. Subfamily: Scarabaeinae. Tribe: Scarabaeini

Image © Tina

Image © Tina

Image © Tina

Image © Tina

Image © Tina

Description
Massive (body length 36-50 mm), broad, somewhat flattened, dull black with raised polished areas. Pronotum wider than abdomen. Fore legs prehensile and powerfully developed, especially femora which are equipped with teeth on leading edge.

Distribution
This species occurs from the northern parts of Natal, through northern Transvaal, Zimbabwe and into north-eastern Botswana.

Habitat
Bushveld and savannah, it prefers deep sand.

Biology
Diunal, commonly seen in flight. Adults burrow beside fresh dung of various mammals, dumping excavated soil on top of the dung and filling tunnels with dung, probably for feeding only. Tunnels are sealed with soil. Also rolls dung balls away for burial, presumably for making brood balls-

Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Thu Sep 24, 2015 2:11 pm

Flatface Longhorn Beetle Titoceres jaspideus
Family: Cerambycidae Subfamily: Lamiinae

Image

Image
KTP

Distribution
Titoceres jaspideus is a common species throughout Africa, extending from South Africa northward.

Host Plants
Longhorned beetles, including Titoceres jaspideus, are serious pests of Acacia trees.

Acacia trees occur in a wide area of semi-arid land across sub-Saharan Africa. The Acacias are of high economic, environmental and social importance. Common direct and indirect benefits of Acacia trees include supply of fuel wood, charcoal, timber, pharmaceuticals, honey, fruit, pesticides, and forage. Moreover, Acacias are used for erosion control, soil improvement and particularly in agroforestry as shade dispensers, ornamental and intercropping trees. The major producers of marketable gum are Acacia senegal (Hashab gum) and A. seyal. Many factors interfere with the health of Acacia trees, among the most important are pest insects.

T. jaspideus host plants:
Acacia: A. raddiana, A. seyal, Cassia florida (Somalia), Cassia petersiana and Dichrostachys (Mozambique)

Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Sun Dec 27, 2015 12:09 pm

White-legged Toktokkie Dichtha incantatoris
Family: Tenebrionidae. Subfamily: Pimeliinae. Tribe: Sepidiini

Image © steamtrainfan
Pilanesberg, Bakgatla camp

Description
Large (body length 22 mm). The body is black, stout and globular with ridged smooth wing covers. Pronotum sparsely punctured in centre, more heavily at sides. The antennae and legs are pale cream owing to the dense down which covers them.

The adults tap out a rhythm on the ground to attract and locate mates. They feed on both plant and animal material.

Re: AW Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Sat Feb 13, 2016 12:08 pm

Arrow Poison Flea Beetle Polyclada sp.
Family: Chrysomelidae. Subfamily: Galerucinae. Tribe: Alticini

Image © BluTuna
Male, Kruger National Park, Skukuza

The Alticini is a tribe composed of minute to medium sized beetles, whose enlarged hind femora and renowned jumping ability have earned them the common name of ‘flea beetles’. They are highly specialised phytophagous insects. Both the adult and larval stages feed on stems, leaves or roots, and rarely on flowers, in almost all the higher plant families. The tribe Alticini includes 4, 000 to 8, 000 species, grouped in approximately 500 genera. This taxon has a world-wide distribution, but occurs mainly in the tropical regions of South America, Africa and Asia.

Sixteen species of Polyclada have been described. They have Antennae with 11 antennomeres. Antennomeres 4–10 pectinate or flabellate in male and serrate in female.

The larvae are used to make arrow poison for hunting. Polyclada beetles, along with beetles in the related genus Diamphidia, are noteworthy because their larvae bioaccumulate toxins derived from the plants on which they feed.

Re: Africa Wild Insect Book: Beetles - Photos & Descriptions

Sat Feb 13, 2016 12:54 pm

Flatface Longhorn Beetle Prosopocera (Dalterus) blairiella blairiella
Superfamily: Chrysomeloidea. Family: Cerambycidae. Subfamily: Lamiinae. Tribe: Prosopocerini

Image © BluTuna
Kruger National Park, Skukuza

Description
Size: 10 mm.

Geographical distribution
Botswana, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe.