Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Wed Jan 15, 2014 11:24 pm

Kruger

Grey-Headed Bush-Shrike
15.3.2011 - around Talamati

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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Thu Jan 16, 2014 1:00 pm

Common Fiscal, taken in Johannesburg

Male
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Female
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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:29 am

Thanks for all your pics to brighten up this interesting thread ^Q^ ^Q^

I need to move a bit faster for month-end 0*\ =O: =O:
Common fiscal, Lanius collaris, -,
is a member of the shrike family. Otherwise also referred to as Fiscal Shrike, it is found through most of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Size 21-23

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This stunning African mystery bird and the taxman share something.

The common fiscal, Lanius collaris, which is a shrike got its common name in honour of the fiskaal -- a taxman associated with the Dutch East India company. The fiskaal, who wore black and white whilst doing his job, collected year end (fiscal) taxes, viciously preying on people's money and leaving them hanging 'out to dry'.

Adult common fiscals are black and white. Like all shrikes, the common fiscal impales its victims on thorns (sometimes still alive), leaving them hanging 'out to dry' -- or until the bird is hungry. , the spikes on barbed-wire fences or any available sharp point. This helps them to tear the flesh into smaller, more conveniently-sized fragments, and serves as a cache so that the shrike can return to the uneaten portions at a later time.

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This same behavior of impaling insects serves as an adaptation to eating the toxic lubber grasshopper, Romalea guttata. The bird waits for 1–2 days for the toxins within the grasshopper to degrade, and then can eat it.

Predictably, this species has a variety of other common names, such as Jacky Hangman as well as the butcherbird (a name applied to all shrikes).

Shrikes make regular use of exposed perch sites, where they adopt a conspicuous upright stance. These sites are used in order to watch for prey items and to advertise their presence to rivals.

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Shrikes are territorial, and these territories are defended from other pairs.
Territorial size is directly related to the density of hunting perches. Installing more artificial perches causes the bird to reduce its territory and allow more birds in a specific range.

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In migratory species a breeding territory is defended in the breeding grounds and a smaller feeding territory is established during migration and in the wintering grounds. Where several species of shrike exist together competition for territories can be intense.

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Population : The global population size is not threatened, in fact it is widespread and common

It is extremely common in man-made habitats such as gardens, parks, farmland and roadside

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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Fri Jan 17, 2014 7:32 pm

Common Fiscal, juv

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Addo Jan. 2011

Common Fiscal

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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:40 pm

This young Fiscal Shrike is currently acting as if he is the boss on my front lawn 0*\

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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:44 pm

Addo 16.10.2012

Common Fiscal(Shrike)
around Spekboom

Image wet 0'

Image dry ;-)

Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Fri Jan 17, 2014 9:55 pm

Common Fiscal (Fiscal Shrike)
27.1.2012 - around Nossob
Image 1.4.2013

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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:17 am

Red Backed Shrike

Red-backed shrikes are slightly larger, but slimmer, than house sparrows. The male is unmistakable with a bluish-grey head, black mask, bright chestnut back and thick hooked black bill. Shrikes like to perch prominently on the tops of bushes, fence posts and telephone wires, where they have a good view of potential prey.
Items caught are then taken to a larder where they are impaled on a thorn or wedged in a fork.

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Females have rusty brown upper parts and paler underparts with crosswise streaked patterning. They also have less distinct dark brown masks. Juveniles resemble females but have more reddish brown backs and more prominent streaked patterning also on their upper parts.
Red-backed Shrike’s legs are blackish (male) or brownish grey (female). Their beaks are black (male) or dark brown (female). They have dark brown irises.

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Distribution and habitat[edit]
This bird breeds in most of Europe and western Asia and winters in tropical Africa. The bird is redlisted as a Least Concern (LC) specie on a global scale, but some parts of its habitat have seen a steep decline in both numbers and breeding pairs, so locally the redlisting can be more alarming.

Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:57 pm

Redbacked Shrike, Rietvlei

Male
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Female
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Re: Shrike - BIRD OF THE MONTH JANUARY 2014

Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:04 pm

Red-backed shrike

ImageMale

ImageFemale
Southern Kruger, Jan. 2013