Re: African Elephant

Fri Nov 13, 2015 9:54 pm

Here is my story on How to make elephant dung paper. and a plaster paris track for anyone who wants to know.

First you need a bucket elephant dung water paper and coloured cardboard then you have to tear the paper into little pieces then put them in the bucket then

Do the same thing with the cardboard then break the elephant dung and put it in then put sum water in not to much mush it up then let it dry for 2 days.

To make a track you need plaster water and a bucket and you need to find a track that is a little bit wet draw a circle around it put the plaster in the bucket

Put sum water in the bucket to and again not to much

Then get a stick and mix put it on the track wait for the plaster paris to dry for 20.

And that’s how you make elephant dung paper and a track.


http://www.londolozi.com/cubsden/how-to ... ung-paper/

Re: African Elephant

Tue Dec 01, 2015 9:32 am

An albino elephant on Kapama Game Reserve

By Adine Roode
23 November 2015

Image

The albino elephant, also known as the white elephant, is a very rare type of elephant indeed. Often depicted as ‘white’, the albino elephant’s skin is soft and reddish-brown in colour, which turns to light pink when wet. This kind of elephant also has fair toenails and eyelashes.

While albinism is thought to be fairly common in Asian elephants, it is much less common in the larger African species. Experts are unsure of long-term survival rates for this kind of elephant. The blazing African sunlight could well cause blindness and skin problems for the calf. We noticed when the young calf was a few months old that he would normally stand in his mother’s shade.

In a 2009 BBC News article, Rebecca Morelle (a science reporter for BBC News) captured a pink elephant and quoted ecologist, Dr Mike Chase, who runs conservation charity Elephants Without Borders, “I have only come across three references to albino calves, which have occurred in Kruger National Park in South Africa.”

Our wild herd on Kapama originated from the Kruger National Park and found their new home on the Kapama Game Reserve between 1992 and 1997. This calf is now about 5 years of age, and as you can see on the picture he still has the pink eyes and lashes.

Image

Rebecca Morelle further quoted Mike Chase; “Already the two-to-three-month-old calf seems to be walking in the shade of its mother. This behaviour suggests it is aware of its susceptibility to the harsh African sun, and adapted a unique behaviour to improve its chances of survival”. He added, “I have learned that elephants are highly adaptable, intelligent and masters of survival.” I fully agree with this!

Adine Roode

MD, Camp Jabulani

Re: African Elephant

Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:17 am

It gets much darker with age, though \O

Re: African Elephant

Tue Dec 01, 2015 3:54 pm

Very unique indeed, even if not necessarily pretty. --00--

Rebecca Morelle further quoted Mike Chase; “Already the two-to-three-month-old calf seems to be walking in the shade of its mother. This behaviour suggests it is aware of its susceptibility to the harsh African sun, and adapted a unique behaviour to improve its chances of survival”. He added, “I have learned that elephants are highly adaptable, intelligent and masters of survival.” I fully agree with this!


Clever calf! \O

Re: African Elephant

Tue Dec 01, 2015 6:30 pm

not the best to wear... an albinos costume 0*\

maybe will have some problems later... with eyes O-/

:ty: for posting

Re: African Elephant

Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:42 am

Adorable baby elephant can’t control his trunk.

This baby elephant has just become aware of a very important feature – his trunk.
However, getting to grips with his appendage appears to be trickier than it looks.

As the little one follows its elders, it can barely walk as its unruly trunk swings from side to side and spins around.

The adorable clip even shows the frustrated animal trying to step on its trunk in an attempt to control it.

The funny video was filmed by Mario Paul in the Pretoriuskop region of South Africa’s famous Kruger National Park.

Usually, visitors are treated to more dramatic displays of animal prowess while on safari. Yet it’s the little glimpses of the funnier sides to life in the park that are often the most memorable.

phpBB [video]

Re: African Elephant

Fri Mar 25, 2016 12:22 pm

cute little thing 0/0

but it seems they are a bit too near from the herd 0*\

Re: African Elephant

Fri Mar 25, 2016 12:32 pm

Yes, Nan they are 0-

Re: African Elephant

Fri Mar 25, 2016 1:21 pm

Brilliant! ^Q^ ^Q^ ^Q^

Re: African Elephant

Tue Jun 14, 2016 10:19 am

A change in attitude toward elephant riding

After years of advocacy and investigation, the National Council of SPCAs' efforts to reveal the truth behind elephant rides or elephant-back safaris is paying off through public awareness, pressure, and impact.

Imagekolibri5 via pixabay

Manager of the NSPCA’s Wildlife Protection Unit, Inspector Isabel Wentzel, believes that factors influencing tourists (especially from overseas), tour operators and public opinion generally include the NSPCA exposé of cruel, inhumane and totally unacceptable training methods in South Africa. “Until we published photographs and irrefutable evidence that this was happening in our own country, there was a misunderstanding. It was generally thought that such methods were only used in Asia. Not so. From then on there was a ripple effect and a general reaction against elephant riding which continues and the consequences are now being felt by the industries who operate them.”

Many tour operators will no longer bring tourists to reserves where elephant-back safaris take place. This appears to be a general movement against elephant riding as it is now commonplace that tour operators determine whether such activities take place before making bookings.

“Money talks. When bookings are lost on ethical grounds because of people’s recognition that an activity is simply not acceptable, change does occur. We know that other facilities offering elephant riding are being adversely affected.”

The NSPCA policy is that wild animals belong in the wild. Travel publications and airline magazines were approached to explain that there is no quick, easy or humane way to “train” elephants to accept humans riding them, nor to “tame” wild elephants often forcibly removed from their herds, in itself inhumane and unacceptable. The NSPCA shall remain steadfast on this issue and will continue to motivate ethical tourism and humane practices.