Cheetah

Wed Jun 13, 2012 2:24 pm

The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) is a large-sized feline (family Felidae, subfamily Felinae) inhabiting most of Africa and parts of the Middle East. It is the only extant member of the genus Acinonyx. The cheetah achieves by far the fastest land speed of any living animal—between 112 and 120 km/h (70 and 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to over 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds.

This cat is also notable for modifications in the species' paws. It is one of the only felids with semi-retractable claws, and with pads that, by their scope, disallow gripping. Thus, cheetahs cannot climb upright trees, although they are generally capable of reaching easily accessible branches by leaping.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Re: Cheetah

Wed Jun 13, 2012 3:42 pm

Great shots Flutterby

Image

Re: Cheetah

Wed Jun 13, 2012 4:06 pm

The king cheetah is a rare mutation of cheetah characterized by a distinct fur pattern. It was first noted in what was then Southern Rhodesia (modern-day Zimbabwe) in 1926. In 1927, the naturalist Reginald Innes Pocock declared it a separate species, but reversed this decision in 1939 due to lack of evidence, but in 1928, a skin purchased by Walter Rothschild was found to be intermediate in pattern between the king cheetah and spotted cheetah and Abel Chapman considered it to be a color form of the spotted cheetah. Twenty-two such skins were found between 1926 and 1974. Since 1927, the king cheetah was reported five more times in the wild. Although strangely marked skins had come from Africa, a live king cheetah was not photographed until 1974 in South Africa's Kruger National Park. Cryptozoologists Paul and Lena Bottriell photographed one during an expedition in 1975. They also managed to obtain stuffed specimens. It appeared larger than a spotted cheetah and its fur had a different texture. There was another wild sighting in 1986—the first in seven years. By 1987, thirty-eight specimens had been recorded, many from pelts.
Its species status was resolved in 1981 when king cheetahs were born at the De Wildt Cheetah and Wildlife Centre in South Africa. In May 1981, two spotted sisters gave birth there and each litter contained one king cheetah. The sisters had both mated with a wild-caught male from the Transvaal area (where king cheetahs had been recorded). Further king cheetahs were later born at the Centre. It has been known to exist in Zimbabwe, Botswana and in the northern part of South Africa's Transvaal province. A recessive gene must be inherited from both parents for this pattern to appear, which is one reason why it is so rare.

Image ©artprintimages.com

Image ©simonandbaker.com

Image ©animalsofourplanet.webs.com

Other rare color morphs of the species include speckles, melanism, albinism and gray coloration. Most have been reported in Indian cheetahs, particularly in captive specimens kept for hunting.

Image ©2.bp.blogspot.com

Re: Cheetah

Thu Jun 14, 2012 11:22 am

that spotless chap looks funny and the king cheetah is great \O

Image

Re: Cheetah

Wed Oct 17, 2012 10:03 am

Image

Image

Cheetah - Animal of the Month: November 2012

Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:27 pm

Looks like I have been herded into this. -O -O

This cat is truly built for speed! Virtually every part of its body is adapted in some way to help it run faster.
Special paw pads and semi-retractable claws provide great traction. Large nostrils and lungs provide quick air intake; a large liver, heart and adrenals also facilitate a rapid physical response.
A long, fluid, greyhound-like body is streamlined over light bones. Small collarbones and vertical shoulder blades help lengthen the stride. The tail acts as a rudder for quick turning plus the eye's retinal fovea is of an elongated shape, giving the cheetah a sharp, wide-angle view of its surroundings.
The dark tear marks beneath each eye may also enhance its visual acuity by minimizing the sun's glare. The spine works as a spring for the powerful back legs to give the cheetah added reach for each step. But the great speed is very taxing physiologically.
The top speed, 71 miles per hour (114 kilometers per hour), can usually be maintained for only 200-300 yards. (274 meters).
At that point the cheetah's body temperature increases from the exertion and rest is mandatory as their brains are overheating and they would die if they do not rest.

Image

Re: Cheetah - Animal of the Month November

Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:38 pm

Very interesting PN. Is it safe to say, when a cheetah runs, you can keep watching, 'cos it won't be for long.

I have heard that his rest period could take up to 1/2 hour. Can this be?

Re: Cheetah - Animal of the Month November

Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:44 pm

Yep.
Even up to an hour.
It is not that they are too tired too eat straight away, but they need the oxygen intake to cool their brains down and that is when they are most likely for having their prey stolen away from them

Re: Cheetah - Animal of the Month November

Thu Nov 01, 2012 9:31 pm

Good choice Penga and nice introduction. \O

Gives me the chance to show these again. O/\

KTP. December 2011.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

It was at this point that she called her three cubs down to her.

Re: Cheetah - Animal of the Month November

Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:17 pm

Penga Ndlovu wrote: This cat is truly built for speed! Virtually every part of its body is adapted in some way to help it run faster.
Special paw pads and semi-retractable claws provide great traction

like this one - Sept. 2012
Image
O/\

what a thread ^Q^ ^Q^ ^Q^ ^Q^ O0