Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 02, 2016 6:15 pm

Ja, and sometimes they use vulture parts for muti (traditional medicine) as per the previous incident.

Anyway, this one was quite far northeast in the Pafuri section, "closer" to both Zim and Moz borders.

But the type of poison is important. Very important!

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 02, 2016 6:29 pm

Puff Addy wrote:Circling vultures give away poaching activities, Lisabeth.

It's like disabling the burglar alarm.
Sure! 0*\ But it is disgusting non the less..........or even more so :evil:

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 02, 2016 7:33 pm

I wouldn't have thought the poaching mess could get any worse... Well, I was totally wrong.
What a waste of life. O/

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 02, 2016 7:39 pm

So so very punitive, very malicious in trying too prove a point!!!

We have a huge problem!!!!,... not the end!!!!

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Thu Mar 03, 2016 7:35 am

Media Release: Elephant and other wildlife poisoned by poachers in the KNP

Date: 2016-03-02

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Kruger National Park (KNP) discovered an elephant carcass, 110 dead white back vultures, two male lions and two black back jackals killed by wildlife poisoning on Saturday, 27 February 2016. The elephant carcass was found with gun shots to its head, its tusks were removed and poison was laced on it. Scavengers in the vicinity of the elephant carcass were poisoned from feeding the exposed areas of the carcass.

“It seems poachers have resorted to wildlife poisoning in the National Parks and other protected areas in Southern Africa and we are devastated by these latest mortalities of our wildlife. Wildlife poisoning is not only a threat to our biodiversity assets, but a single incident can affect hundreds of species; thus cutting their life short and diminishing their ecological role;” said the Managing Executive of KNP, Glenn Phillips.

Last year, the Park experienced a similar incident wherein one elephant and four African lions suffered the same fate; with 46 vultures and 1 sub adult bateleur all dying from poisoning. An incident of deliberate poisoning of black-backed jackal and other small predators in Addo Elephant National Park in 2014 resembled the same pattern of an attempt to kill wildlife by means of poisoning.

“We would like to thank our anti-poaching teams for their quick response as the outcome could have been worse, had they had detected the situation late. Although poisoning has occurred at a low level in the country in recent history, it is a real problem in our neighbouring countries such as Mozambique and Zimbabwe. A joint operation with all relevant government security structures as well as our neighbouring counterparts; in particular those bordering the far northern part of the Park wherein there is a spate of elephant poaching requires tough regulatory measures to prevent wildlife poisoning and poaching” concluded Phillips.

Issued by:
South African National Parks: Communications & Marketing Department – Kruger National Park.

Media enquiries:
Reynold Thakhuli
Acting Head of Communications - SANParks
Tel: 012 426 5203; Cell: 073 373 4999
Email: rey.thakhuli@sanparks.org

William Mabasa
GM: Communications & Marketing, Kruger National Park
Tel: 013 735 4363, cell: 082 807 3919
Email: william.mabasa@sanparks.org

https://www.sanparks.org/about/news/?id=56608

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Fri Mar 04, 2016 1:52 pm

SKUKUZA – A second mass poisoning has taken place in the Kruger National Park (KNP), claiming 110 of the critically endangered white-backed vultures, one elephant, two lions and two black-backed jackals.

This follows after an elephant, four lions, 46 white-backed vultures and a bateleur were poisoned in October last year. Both poisonings took place in the Vlakteplaas section of the park.

The second discovery was made on Saturday. The elephant had gunshots to its head and the tusks were removed before poison was placed in the carcass. The vultures and jackals fed on the contaminated carcass and consequently died.

Mr André Botha, manager of Birds of Prey Programme at Endangered Wildlife Trust, told Lowvelder that this poisoning claimed 4,5 per cent of Kruger’s white-backed vulture population. “This is having a massive impact on the population,” he warned. Botha added that they had conducted an aerial survey of the white-backed vultures in the park last year and counted 900 nests. It is estimated that there are about 3 000 in the Kruger.

Botha said the reasons for these poisonings could be two-fold. The first and most obvious one would be for muti. Traditional healers believe that vulture heads give clairvoyant powers. “Also, rhino horn can be removed within 10 minutes. However, it takes up to two hours to remove elephant tusks. Vultures point rangers to carcasses and this would attract unwanted attention to poachers. Eliminating vultures would enable them to complete the ‘job’ undisturbed,” he explained.

Botha said carbofuran had been used during last year’s poisoning and he suspected it was used during the latest incident too. “Carbofuran is similar to temic (two-step) and a very fast-acting poison. It would definitely pose a threat to humans who were to use the contaminated vultures for muti,” he warned.

Botha added yesterday that rangers were still busy cleaning and clearing the scene. “They have to be very thorough. Poisoned animals often vomit pieces of the contaminated meat before dying. They have to sweep the area very carefully and collect all these samples to prevent other incidents of poisoning. All contaminated carcasses will have to be burnt.”

Mr Glenn Phillips, managing executive of the KNP, said in a media statement, “It seems poachers have resorted to wildlife poisoning in national parks and other protected areas in southern Africa and we are devastated by these latest mortalities of our wildlife. Wildlife poisoning is not only a threat to our biodiversity assets, but a single incident can affect hundreds of species; thus cutting their life short and diminishing their ecological role.”

He thanked SANParks’ anti-poaching teams for their quick response as the outcome could have been worse, had they had detected the situation late.

“Although poisoning has occurred at a low level in the country in recent history, it is a real problem in our neighbouring countries such as Mozambique and Zimbabwe. A joint operation with all relevant government security structures as well as our neighbouring counterparts; in particular those bordering the far northern part of the park wherein there is a spate of elephant poaching, requires tough regulatory measures to prevent wildlife poisoning and poaching,” Phillips said.

Botha concurred, “Credit must go to the SANParks members for their rapid reaction once the incident was discovered. Had it not been for this intervention, the scale of loss could have been far worse. Well done to the section ranger, his field rangers and other staff involved in managing the incident under very unpleasant circumstances.
“I have no doubt that the culprits will be brought to book regardless of where they may be based.”

http://lowvelder.co.za/318938/second-ma ... ts-kruger/

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Fri Mar 04, 2016 6:06 pm

Botha said carbofuran had been used during last year’s poisoning and he suspected it was used during the latest incident too. “Carbofuran is similar to temic (two-step) and a very fast-acting poison. It would definitely pose a threat to humans who were to use the contaminated vultures for muti,” he warned.

This is significant, and as said, the type of poison is important to be confirmed!

The Vlakteplaas thing is confusing! @#$

As said, closer to Zim, so don't know what the story is, or if it matters! 0:


viewtopic.php?f=237&t=6321&start=90

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Fri Mar 04, 2016 7:40 pm

http://www.citizen.co.za/1018984/elepha ... er-sought/

4.3.2016 10:45 am
Elephant tusks worth R4m confiscated, owner sought
Andrea Küsel


six of the tusks seemed to have been recently removed from elephants, while the others appeared to be much older.

The identity of the owner of the 26 elephant tusks confiscated at a business premises in Derdepoort, north of Pretoria, remains unknown.

The tusks are worth an estimated R4 million, Rekord East reported.

The company, Big Buck Taxidermy, was raided by police on Wednesday.

Hawkas spokesperson Major Robert Netshiunda said: “We are continuing investigations to establish who the tusks belong to and where the business got them from.”

Paul O’Sullivan, a forensic investigator at O’Sullivan and Associates, said six of the tusks seemed to have been recently removed from elephants, while the others appeared to be much older.

SANParks spokesperson Reynold Thakhuli said he would not speculate on whether or not the discovery was linked to the recent killing of an elephant which was smeared with poison, seemingly to kill scavengers.

He said two lions and hundreds of vultures have died from feeding on the poisoned carcass.

“Poaching is a war that we’ll never win alone in the bush. We’re calling on all citizens to contact law enforcement agencies when they have any information on illegal poaching activities,” added Thakuli.

He said this was the second time an elephant had died as a result of poaching since December last year.

No arrests have been made.

– Caxton News Service

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 09, 2016 2:39 pm

http://www.citizen.co.za/1025942/game-s ... -for-muti/

9.3.2016 11:00 am
Game ‘slaughtered for muti’
Alex Mitchley


Muti may be behind the mass poisoning of wildlife, including vultures for their heads, during poaching incidents.

The Kruger National Park (KNP) recently painted a grisly scene of animal carcasses strewn around the remains of an elephant as a number of animals were found poisoned.

In what can be described as a mass killing, an elephant was found to have been shot for its ivory and then poisoned, which led to the deaths of 110 white-backed vultures, two male lions and two black-backed jackals, which were found dead after allegedly being poisoned by poachers.

Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa’s (Wessa) senior manager for wildlife and conservation initiatives, Chris Galliers, said one of the reasons poachers use poison is to target species – particularly vultures (vulture heads) and in some cases lions (for lion bones, claws, tail and teeth) for tradeable items.

“For example, the vulture heads are used for medicinal and superstitious purposes,” Galliers said.

Acting head of communications at South African National Parks (SANParks) Reynold Thakhuli said it was suspected the animals poisoned were harvested by poachers for muti purposes, with animal parts being put on to the traditional medicines market.

The other reason for the poisoning may be that it is used as a tactic to delay response time by law enforcement officials or game rangers.

“Vultures are a good indicator. Where there are vultures, there might be a carcass. “By poisoning the carcass they delay the response time. So we don’t get to the crime scenes earlier,” said Thakhuli.

Scavengers in the vicinity of the elephant carcass were poisoned by feeding on the exposed areas of the carcass. Galliers said vultures can provide an early detection service to park rangers in poaching incidents, making it harder for poachers to take the illegal bounty and flee the scene.

The ploy to use poison is an immense threat to the ecological system and has the potential of wiping out species, not just animals, and it can destroy the biodiversity as a whole, said SANParks. Wessa said the use of poison was an indiscriminate killer of wildlife, with the ability to wipe out large numbers of animals in one go.

“Vultures are severely threatened and a mass killing poses a large threat to the overall population,” said Galliers.

While SANParks said the poison used in the recent attack is being analysed, Wessa said lethal chemicals such as the aldicarb-based poisons (eg temik, which is illegal) pose a major toxic threat to both wildlife and humans.

Last year, the park suffered a similar horrific incident where one elephant, four lions, 46 vultures and one adult bateleur eagle suffered the same fate, all dying from poisoning.

An incident of deliberate poisoning of black-backed jackals and other small predators in Addo Elephant National Park in 2014 followed the same pattern of an attempt to kill wildlife through poisoning.

According to a study by the conservation journal Oryx between 2012 and 2014, 155 elephants and 2 044 vultures were killed in 11 poaching-related incidents in seven African countries.

alexm@citizen.co.za

Re: Elephant Poaching in South Africa

Wed Mar 09, 2016 6:21 pm

Interesting, that Derdepoort story!

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